Daily Archives: October 12, 2015

Your Success Is In Direct Porportion To Your Absolution

Matthew 6:14-15 For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. 15 But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins.   
You thought you knew the truth but it wasn’t there and it never will be until you know where to look… Make sure you see it, this is your life, make one mistake and it can easily be taken away. Some say our lives are defined by the sum of our choices, but it isn’t really our choices that distinguish who we are, it’s our commitment to them. There’s an old saying about those who can’t remember the past being condemned to repeat it. But those of us who refuse to forget the past are condemned to relive it. The past doesn’t equal the future. 
Always question where your loyalties lie. The people you trust will expect it, your greatest enemies will desire it, and those you treasure the most will absolutely without fail abuse it. Some say loyalty inspires boundless hope and while that may be, there is a catch. True loyalty takes years to build and only seconds to destroy.
The greatest weapon anyone can use against us is our own mind, by preying on the doubts and uncertainties that already lurk there. Are we true to ourselves, or do we live for the expectations of others? And if we are open and honest, can we ever truly be loved? Can we find the courage to release our deepest secrets, or in the end, are we all unknowable? Even to ourselves. 
A conflicted heart feeds on doubt, confusion. It will make you question your path. Your tactics. Your motives. When you stare ahead and darkness is all you see, only reason and determination can pull you back from the abyss. Truth is a battle of perceptions. People only see what they’re prepared to confront. It’s not what you look at that matters but what you see. And when different perceptions battle against one another, the truth has a way of getting lost. Doubt is a disease. It infects the mind, creating a mistrust of people’s motives and of one’s own perceptions. Doubt has the ability to call into question everything you ever believed about someone, and reinforce the darkest suspicions of our inner circles. If the doors of perception were cleansed, everything would appear to man as infinite.’ But in reality our perception is often clouded by expectations. By experiences.
When I was a little girl, my understanding of life was as simple as the Sunday school proverbs it lives within, ‘Do unto others’ and ‘Two wrongs don’t make a right.’ But two wrongs can never make a right, because two wrongs can never equal each other. For the truly wronged, real satisfaction can only be found in one of two places absolute forgiveness or mortal vindication. They say grief occurs in five stages. First, there’s denial, followed by anger. Then comes bargaining, depression and acceptance. But grief is a merciless master. Just when you think you’re free, you realize you never stood a chance. 
Absolution is the washing away of sin, a promise of rebirth and a chance to escape the transgressions of those who came before us. The best among us will learn from the mistakes of the past. Absolution is the most powerful form of forgiveness. A full pardon from suspicion and accountability. It’s the liberation of a stolen future. A future many never lived to see. Absolution is a mercy some people will never know.

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NEWSFLASH: These 8 Cities Just Abolished Columbus Day

Three more cities adopted Indigenous Peoples’ Day in just the past 48 hours.

Lisa-Christiansen

Following a growing trend, the city council of Albuquerque, New Mexico has voted six to three to recognize October 12th – typically known to most as “Columbus Day” within the USA– as Indigenous Peoples’ day in a new proclamation. Albuquerque has the highest concentration of Indigenous people in New Mexico.

In the past two months, eight cities got rid of Columbus Day in favor of adopting Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Three of those cities adopted Indigenous Peoples’ Day this week.

Albuquerque, New Mexico – The city’s formal declaration”encourages businesses, organizations and public entities to recognize Indigenous Peoples Day, which shall be used to reflect upon the ongoing struggles of Indigenous people on this land, and to celebrate the thriving culture and value that our Indigenous nations add to our City.”

Lawrence, KS – Since September, students from Haskell University in Lawrence, Kansas have been taking initiative and pushing for the city to honor their ancestors by declaring October 12th Indigenous Peoples’ day. Just this Wednesday, they won.

Portland, OR – Portland’s City Council declared Indigenous Peoples’ day on Tuesday, something tribal leaders have been seeking since 1954.

St. Paul, MN – In August, St. Paul followed Minneapolis by declaring Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead of Columbus Day. Minneapolis passed its own resolution last year.

Bexar County, TX – The resolution was passed Tuesday, and local activists intend to press for the same thing in San Antonio.

Anadarko, OK – In September, Anadarko declared Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Anadarko Mayor Kyle Eastwood signed the proclamation while surrounded by tribal leaders from the Apache, Choctaw, Delaware, Wichita and others.

Olympia, WA – Mayor Pro Tem Nathaniel Jones presented Olympia’s proclamation at a rally in August. Nearly 150 people showed up to support the initiative.

Alpena, MI – In September, Mayor Matt Waligora declared Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The city says they desire “to develop a strong and productive relationship with all indigenous peoples, including the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, based on mutual respect and trust.”

These cities are following in the footsteps of Seattle and Minneapolis. Meanwhile, Oklahoma City came close to passing it in September and will try to pass it again on October 13th, the day after the holiday.

City Council Member Rey Garduño wrote and proposed the proclamation, with guidance from local activists. The campaign was initiated last year during an “Abolish Columbus Day” demonstration at City Hall.

Although these changes have been quite recent, the struggle for the recognition of Indigenous Peoples Day has been going on since 1954, when the idea was first proposed in Portland, OR.

The Albuquerque Police Department have a notorious record of harassing and killing oppressed people. Their law enforcement divisions have shot 50 people resulting in 28 fatalities since 2010. In Albuquerque, Indigenous people compose 4.6 of the city’s population, but 13% of its consistently homeless population.

This name change is a fantastic trend that needs to grow fast, but it needs to be followed up by concrete action and legislation. Nationwide (and worldwide – particularly in Latin American countries that have suffered from US-backed coups), Indigenous people suffer from economic inequality, health problems, and human rights abuses. It’s time we celebrate their culture and tradition rather than their oppressors’, and it’s time we give back to those we’ve taken so much from.

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